The first Mushrooms of the Forest – Vegan Chanterelle Stew!

The first Mushrooms of the Forest – Vegan Chanterelle Stew!

We have just had a week with loads of rain showers and today the sun was shining & it means that the forest is full of mushroom and berries. So we packed the backpack with coffee and smorgas! – we are from Scandinavia – after all 🙂 Put on our hiking gear and off we went as merry dwarfs to the forest.

On our way to the forest we did see wild strawberries and blueberries, tasted just a few, we wanted to go further away from the road before starting to have a feast in wild berries.

In the forest we were not disappointed; wild strawberries in abundance and loads of blueberries – we had to walk another hour's time before we saw the first mushrooms “chanterelles” and picked two big handful each, enough for two generous servings of Chanterelles Stew.

We always use the same recipe, the season is fairly short, so we just make our favorite. The original recipe calls for butter and full fat cream but it is easy to replace with vegan ingredients as we have done for years by now. We serve with rye bread again we are from Scandinavia, so a natural choice. You can use the bread of your preference, only thing is don't use a sour bread with a too sourish taste, it ruins the mild taste of the musrooms.

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Chanterelle Stew w/ Rye Bread

Coconut cream is very similar to coconut milk but contains less water. The difference is mainly consistency. It has a thicker, more paste-like consistency, while coconut milk is generally a liquid. The preparation time might be sat a bit high but it does take time to clean the mushrooms.

20 min

25 min

45 min

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Ingredients

  • 5 handfuls of chanterelles
  • 3 small onions - ordinary zittauer (yellow) chopped
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 Tbsp coconut cream
  • salt & white pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Clean the chantarelles with a brush - do NOT wash them in water
  2. Peel and chop the onions
  3. Heat the pan add the coconut oil, when fluently add the chantarelles, let fry until dry (they will release some liquid just let them stay on the pan)
  4. Add the onions, fry for approximately 10 minutes
  5. Add the coconut cream and cook for 8-10 minutes, the chantarelles must be soft not chewy
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https://allveganfoods.com/first-mushrooms-forest-vegan-chanterelle-stew/

Photo credit: the top photo “Chanterelle Cantharellus cibarius“. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
Photo within recipe by Susanne Flø

 

¡Hola Vegan Tapas?

¡Hola Vegan Tapas?

 

Tapas are appetizers, or snacks, in Spanish cuisine. They come in a wide variety, and may be cold or hot. It is fairly easy to make vegan versions. Here’s a fine recipe, which is even cheesy. Tapas don't get much better than that. Well, maybe they are even better when they are vegan and raw – and you can store them in your fridge for a few days.

Enjoy!

You can find the recipe at http://www.liveloveraw.com/raw-vegan-cheesy-tapas-recipe/ 

 

 

 

How to make Italian Vegan Sausages

How to make Italian Vegan Sausages

I love Italian vegan sausages, and they are great to take on picnics. I pack and take them along with other lunch goodies on hikes in the forests where I like to roam with my hubby. But I cannot buy vegan sausages in Finland where I live at the moment. So, I did a search and found a great website: http://www.theppk.com
I will make them from the recipe below, and post an update on how they panned out.

1/2 cup cooked white beans (great northern or navy), rinsed and drained
1 cup vegetable broth
1 tablespoon olive oil *or* 1 tablespoon tomato paste (tomato paste is a great fat replacement)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 1/4 cups vital wheat gluten
1/4 cup nutritional yeast
1 teaspoon granulated garlic *or* 2 cloves fresh garlic, finely grated
1 1/2 teaspoons fennel seed, crushed *or* 1 teaspoon ground fennel seed
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
Several dashes fresh black pepper

Before mixing your ingredients, get the steaming apparatus ready, bringing water to a full boil. The rest of the recipe comes together very quickly.

Have ready 4 square sheets of tin foil. In a large bowl, mash the beans until no whole ones are left. Throw all the other ingredients together in the order listed and mix with a fork. Divide dough into 4 even parts (an easy way to do this: split the dough in half and then into quarters). Place one part of dough into tin foil and mold into about a 5 inch log. Wrap dough in tin foil, like a tootsie roll. Don’t worry too much about shaping it, it will snap into shape while it’s steaming because this recipe is awesome.

Place wrapped sausages in steamer and steam for 40 minutes. That’s it! You can unwrap and enjoy immediately or refrigerate until ready to use.

The recipe and tips on how to: http://www.theppk.com/2012/01/vegan_sausage/

UPDATE: they are now a part of my favorite Italian recipes. They were easy to form, the sausages looked nice and the taste yummy.

Photo credit: Ari Moore

How to Make Vegan Burgers With These 10 Veggies

How to Make Vegan Burgers With These 10 Veggies

Being vegans we can crave a burger, not a beef burger that is. Yes you can choose tofu, tempeh or seitan but you can also use veggies. The trick is to know which veggie to use, so the burger won't fall apart and still tastes great. Yes you can choose tofu, tempeh or seitan.

My favourite is chickpeas and black-eyed peas.

Chickpeas and Black-Eyed Peas

Chickpeas are so amazing and versatile. You can eat them in salads, roast them until they are crunchy, or you can turn them into fabulous burgers. Think of falafels, but bigger. I make the most incredible chickpea burgers and serve them with Tzatziki sauce on top.

Chickpeas are the main ingredient of the World’s Healthiest Veggie Burger Patty as well as in actress Mayim Bialik’s Big Bang Vegan Chickpea Burger Patty.

Check out these top 10 vegetable to use in vegan burgers. #vegansnacks #allveganfoods Click To Tweet

On the other side of the color spectrum from chickpeas are black-eyed peas. These legumes, also known as pigeon peas, are perfect for burgers because they have a taste and texture that’s not too beany or grainy. I use them in my Black-Eyed Pea Burgers with Mississippi Comeback Sauce.

Both chickpeas and black-eyed peas are very mild in flavor, so don’t be shy with the seasonings.

Read about the other veggies at http://www.onegreenplanet.org/

Photo credit: Ewan Munro

How to Grill Asparagus and 11 Recipes

How to Grill Asparagus and 11 Recipes

how to grill asparagusThe first thing to consider is which oil to use when you want to grill asparagus. Coconut oil is more healthy when used for high-heat cooking. Use your expensive Extra Virgin Olive oil for salad dressings. It is easy to use coconut oil and if it's still solid then just take a small amount between your hands. Then give the asparagus a little massage and ‘voila' you have the asparagus covered in coconut oil. Avocado oil is also good for high-heat cooking.

For 2 generous servings you will need:

500 g /1 lb. asparagus
2 Tbsp / 10ml coconut oil
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper

Trim the bases of the asparagus spears. Break them off by hand. I prefer to break them off by hand by starting with the base between my thumb and index finger and giving it a slight bend.

Heat your grill to high 200°C /400°F. Wash the asparagus and pat dry. Place in a baking dish and toss with coconut oil, salt, and ground pepper until all of the spears are coated. When the grill is hot, place the spears across the grates and grill about 3 minutes then flip them over. Grill another 3 minutes or so until just blistering. Remove from heat and serve.

Here are 11 vegan asparagus recipes http://www.glueandglitter.com/ for you to get inspired by.

Mountain Climber and Vegan?

Mountain Climber and Vegan?

Can a serious mountain climber be vegan? Kuntal Joisher who is a software engineer and has climbed Mount Everest says:

I just returned from a trip climbing the north side of Mount Elbrus, the highest peak on the European continent, located in the Caucasus Mountains. Most people whom I met on my trip to Russia were skeptical of my diet during the expedition. See, there are a lot of climbers out there, some of who have even summited Everest, but I'd venture to say that very few of them are vegetarian, let alone strict vegans.

I am a strict vegan climber who attempted to summit Everest this year on a purely vegan diet, and I just summited Elbrus.

Surprisingly, most of the people I met in Russia, including my guide team, had never even heard the word “vegan.” Russia is considered to be a predominantly meat and dairy country due to the harsh weather. Because they can't imagine any meal without either of these items, my new Russian friends were wondering how I would be able to climb the mountain without eating meat or consuming dairy, recommended climbing dietary staples.

Read the article at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Image Courtesy: Rupert Taylor-Price (www.flickr.com/photos/38154080@N00/534748923), Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic | Flickr

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